Recovery, Waste to Energy

Modern waste-to-energy plants (WTE) today are widely used in Europe to produce electricity, steam and heating for buildings. To ensure that hazardous substances are completely destroyed, combustion plants must operate under controlled conditions and high temperatures. For these reasons, the European Union has set well-defined environmental standards for the operation of WTE plants. The objective and the ultimate goal in this field is that the waste used for energy production in the form of steam, electricity or hot water is the residues left behind, although it is still seen as a major challenge for the EU member states themselves. For the EU's Circulation Economy, the benefit from any source is essential. Energy production from waste that does not undergo re-use or recycling is an integral part of the circulating economy.

EU legislation helps Member States to ensure minimization of waste treatment costs, maximizing benefits through energy-efficient incineration. Legislation clearly defines the allowed emission standards for gas emissions from plants and this legislation emphasizes the necessity of their monitoring. EU legislation clearly states that the maximum benefit of any generated heat is important and also sets the thresholds for the energy efficiency generated by urban waste incineration. According to Eurostat data, the production of energy from urban waste in 2016 in Europe has doubled since 1995, significantly reducing the depositing of landfills. The objective and final goal in the waste area is that the waste used for energy production in the form of steam, electricity or hot water to be the remains that are left behind the 3R process although it is still seen as a major challenge for the EU member states themselves.